Tuesday, 30 August 2011

Friars Walk 1 Exeter

In the National Archives we find Alice Edith and the house on Friars Walk Exeter


Devon Record Office 4666M-O/T/17 1920
Contents:
Conveyance
1. Edward Charles Woolmer of Manchester, gent. Charles Llewellyn Howard Tripp of Staple-grove, Somerset, surgeon
2. Elsie, wife of Rev. Douglas McLaren, Canon Residentiary of Exeter Cathedral Mary Penelope Barnes of 14 West Southernhay, Exeter, spinster
Alice Edith, wife of Charles James Vlieland of 20 West Southernhay, doctor
Premises: 1 Friars Walk
Consideration: £400
Date: 20 January 1920
With schedule of deeds, 1869-1911
evon Record Office 4666M-O/T/18 1920

Contents:
Mortgage
1. Elsie McLaren
Mary Penelope Barnes
Alice Edith Vlieland
2. Sidney Andrew of Exeter, solicitor
Premises: 1 Friars Walk, Exeter
Principal: £170
Date: 7 February 1920
Endorsed: Acknowledgement of receipt of £150 from 1 by Alice May Jewell, 29 April 1927
Devon Record Office 4666M-O/T/20 1927

Contents:
Mortgage
1. Elsie McLaren
Mary Penelope Barnes
Alice Edith Vlieland
2. National Provincial Bank Ltd.
Premises: 1 Friars Walk, Exeter
Date: 17 June 1927
With schedule of deeds, 1831-1927
Endorsed: Reconveyance, 17 August 1928

Devon Record Office 4666M-O/T/22 1928

Contents:
Supplemental Abstract of Title (1920-1928)
Elsie McLaren, Mary Penelope Barnes and Alice Edith Vlieland to premises 1 Friars Walk, Exeter

Wednesday, 24 August 2011

Edward John Clervaux Chaytor

Brigadier Edward John Clervaux Chaytor was born on 16 November 1903.

He married, firstly, Margaret Frances Morgan Vlieland, daughter of Charles Archibald Vlieland,and Dorothy Margaret Morgan on 12 November 1938.




He married, secondly, Carina Mary Marcelle on 28 October 1970.
He died on 27 November 1976 at age 73.
He was the son of Maj.-Gen. Sir Edward Walter Clervaux Chaytor(Who was the son of John Clervaux CHAYTOR and Emma Fearon)and Louisa Jane Collins.
He was educated at Wanganui Collegiate School, Wanganui, New Zealand.
He was educated at Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, Kent, England.
He gained the rank of Brigadier in the service of the Royal Artillery.
He fought in the Second World War, where he was mentioned in despatches twice.
His father John Clervaux CHAYTOR
B: 28 Jan 1836
D: 2 Apr 1920
M: 30 Jan 1867

about his father

Edward Walter Clervaux Chaytor was born in Motueka, New Zealand, on 21 June 1868, the first child of Emma Fearon and her husband, John Clervaux Chaytor, a runholder. Between 1880 and 1884 he attended Nelson College as a boarder. After leaving school he took up sheepfarming on the family property at Spring Creek near Blenheim. In 1886 he enlisted in the Marlborough Hussars (later the Marlborough Mounted Rifle Volunteers), and was commissioned as a lieutenant in 1889 and captain in 1893. On 17 October 1898 Chaytor married a widow, Louisa Jane Hiley, at Spring Creek. They were to have three children.
Early in 1900 Chaytor left for the South African War as part of the Third (Rough Riders) Contingent of New Zealand Mounted Rifles. In an action on 26 May at Reit Keil, for which he was mentioned in dispatches, he suffered a severe gunshot wound which shattered his right thigh-bone. Although he later rejoined his unit and took part in several engagements, the wound continued to give trouble and Chaytor, now a major, was invalided home to New Zealand in May 1901.
Chaytor returned to South Africa in February 1902 with the Eighth Contingent as a brevet lieutenant colonel commanding the South Island Regiment. The war ended on 31 May. However, Chaytor's combat experience – periods of hard soldiering spent in the saddle – had furnished him with an invaluable grounding for his later professional career. He was respected by his soldiers, primarily for demonstrating the valuable leadership trait of always being close to the action.
On his return to New Zealand in 1902, Chaytor became a major in the 1st Battalion of the Nelson Mounted Rifle Volunteers. He resigned this position in September, when he was appointed assistant adjutant general at Defence Department headquarters. He retained his brevet rank until it became permanent in 1906. In 1907 he became the first New Zealand officer to attend the British Army's Staff College at Camberley. He graduated with a glowing commendation from the college's commandant, Major General Henry Wilson. On his return to Wellington in 1910 he was appointed director of military training and education.
Chaytor's steady rise in rank continued. He was promoted to colonel in 1911 and from late 1910 commanded the Wellington Military District from its headquarters at Palmerston North. He was appointed adjutant general in July 1914. Now aged 45, his red hair was starting to recede; he had a thinnish face with a prominent Roman nose, sharp blue eyes, a slightly jutting jaw, a resolute mouth, and a moustached upper lip. His placid nature stood him in good stead in the active commands he was about to resume.
At the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914, Chaytor transferred to the staff of the New Zealand Expeditionary Force as the principal personnel and logistics officer to its commander, Major General Sir Alexander Godley. Chaytor played a pivotal planning role for two major overseas deployments. The first was the speedy assembly and dispatch of a 1,400-strong detachment which occupied German Samoa on 29 August 1914. The second, and more complex, was to raise the main body of the expeditionary force, comprising 8,427 men, 3,815 horses, and all their equipment, which sailed from Wellington on 16 October 1914. The rapid creation of the two formations represents one of the most skilful feats of organisation and administration in New Zealand's military history.
The New Zealanders sailed to Egypt, where Chaytor became assistant adjutant general and (later) acting quartermaster general of the newly formed New Zealand and Australian Division commanded by Godley. They spent several months in training before being sent to Gallipoli in April 1915. A few days after the landing, Chaytor suffered a minor head wound. On 22 May he was hit again, this time in the right shoulder and arm; the wound was serious and he was sent to the Royal Free Hospital in London.
Following his recovery, Godley, in November 1915, gave Chaytor command of the New Zealand Mounted Rifles Brigade in Egypt. This brigade remained behind in the Desert Column of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force when the rest of the New Zealand forces sailed for France early in 1916. Chaytor, now a brigadier, became the senior New Zealand officer in that theatre of the war. His immediate superior was an Australian, Major General Harry Chauvel. Both were tactically competent and sound leaders with similar backgrounds. They got along well together, and Chauvel rated the New Zealand Mounted Rifles his best brigade.
Nearly 18,000 New Zealanders served at various times in the almost forgotten campaign in Palestine, and Chaytor proved to be an imaginative and able commander. On 19 July 1916, in what was one of the first examples of a senior commander personally exploiting the new technology of flight, he used an aircraft to reconnoitre Turkish positions in the Sinai desert; he was slightly wounded by ground fire.
It took the Egyptian Expeditionary Force until January 1917 to clear the Sinai of Turkish forces. Chaytor's tactical self-confidence came to the fore at Rafah, the final battle in the Sinai campaign. After a hard, day-long action against a stubborn Turkish defence, the British commander, Lieutenant General Philip Chetwode, aware that Turkish reinforcements were on the way, ordered his units to withdraw from the assault on the town. Chaytor, about to launch an attack with his brigade, chose to ignore the order; in the ensuing attack the town's defences were overrun and Rafah was taken.
Chauvel was selected to command the Desert Column in April 1917, and Chaytor took over the Australian and New Zealand Mounted Division, being promoted to major general; he thus became the first – and only – New Zealander ever to exercise command of an ANZAC force at divisional level. He was knighted for his endeavours in 1918. On 16 September 1918, Chaytor was allocated an additional, division-sized formation. During the final operation of the campaign, 'Chaytor Force' captured Amman in Jordan on 25 September.
An armistice with Turkey came into effect on 31 October 1918. On his return to Wellington in 1919, Chaytor was appointed general officer commanding New Zealand military forces. The difficulties of the period of demobilisation were exacerbated by a spirit of war-weariness evident throughout the country. Nevertheless, steps were taken to create a military organisation which the country could afford, and which would be available for home defence and as the nucleus of an expeditionary force. In 1922 the Defence Department was able to begin preparing for a force of some 7,000 men to be available in the Chanak crisis.
Edward Chaytor retired in 1924 after a relatively short, but exceptionally successful, career as a professional soldier. Seven times mentioned in dispatches, he had been made a KCMG, a KCVO and a CB. Soon after his retirement he sailed for England where he lived with his family until his death at South Kensington in London on 15 June 1939. Louisa Chaytor died in 1948.


Wednesday, 17 August 2011

Emma Rouse


Emma Rouse (1843-1928), was the second child of Edwin Rouse (1806-1862) and his wife Hannah Hipkins (1819-1907) and was a granddaughter of Richard and Elizabeth Rouse of Rouse Hill in the Parramatta district of New South Wales.
She was born at the Rouse family property Guntawang near Mudgee but by the time this photograph was taken, probably in late 1855, Edwin and Hannah Rouse and their children had come to live at Rouse Hill, Edwin having taken responsibility for the property following his father's death. In 1871 Emma married Lieutenant Dudley Davison  Batty, an English army officer, in London. They had met on board the sailing ship Sobraon in 1869, when Emma and her mother, brother Edwin and sister Lizzie were returning from a European trip and Dudley Batty was making a sea voyage for the sake of his health. 


Dudley Batty died in 1878 and Emma never returned to Australia. [ref. Caroline Rouse Thornton Rouse Hill house and the Rouses 1988].
Emma Rouse is the mother of Dudley Batty.
We know that Dudley Batty her son was married with Phoebe Mary Vlieland and he toon photographs of Rouse Hill while visiting.

* South Kensington seems to have been the Batty family home – Comeragh Road, where Phoebe and Dudley lived at Aubrey's birth is just round the corner from Redcliffe Gardens, where Dudley's elder sister was stillborn (20 November 1872, Sydney Herald 27 January 1873) and where he and his wife Emma lived on their marriage (20 July 1871) – officiated by Dudley's two brothers, Edmund and George Staunton, both Reverends (Sydney Herald, 2 October 1871)!

Source: Rouse Hill House & Farm ; R86/513-4
MARRIAGES. On July 20, at St. John's Church, Fulham, by the Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Sydney, assisted by the Rev. Edmund Batty,
vicar, and the Rev. George Staunton Batty, brothers of the
bridegroom, DUDLEY BATTY, Esq., Lieutenant unattached late
66th and 67th Regiments, to EMMA, eldest daughter of the lateFix this text
EDWIN ROUSE, Esq., of Rouse Hall, Australia.

Saturday, 13 August 2011

Eugene Bellairs

Sometimes one thing leads to another and so today we get involved with Eugene Bellairs
We met him in the Priaulx family and found lots of interesting things about him.
So lets start.
He was born: 06 Jul 1824 in Dinan, Brittany, France
Married: 31 Jan 1855 in St George's Church, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Died: 21 Sep 1911 in Ayr St. Parnell, Auckland, New Zealand
Father: John Harry Bellaers Commander R.N.
Mother: Ann Louisa Frances Russell Bull
Married Maria Margaret Priaulx
Born: 06 Jun 1833 in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia
Died: 31 Aug 1898 in Auckland, New Zealand and had 5 children.
01 (F): Adele Maria Louise Bellairs
Born: 17 Aug 1859 in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia
Died: 30 Dec 1948 in 33 Birdwood Cres, Parnell, Auckland, New Zealand
02 (M): Henry Eugene Bellairs
Born: 23 Jun 1861 in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia
Died: 23 Jan 1862 in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia
03 (F): Ida Pauline Bellairs
Born: 25 Oct 1866 in Auckland, New Zealand
Died: 1866 in Auckland, New Zealand
04 (F): Emily Priaulx Bellairs
Born: 07 Jan 1870 in Wellington, South Island, New Zealand
Died: 23 Feb 1870 in Wellington, South Island, New Zealand
05 (F): female Bellairs
Born: about 1873
Died: after 1911
Eugene Bellairs has been a most interesting gentleman to research, leaving his mark on the southern states of Australia as well as on New Zealand.
Eugene was born 6th July 1824 at Dinan, Brittany,France to Ann Louisa Francis Russell BULL and RN Commander John Harry Bellairs. Commander Bellairs must have been stationed there at the time,as at least one sister was also born there.
He was christened at the Anglican Protestant Chapel, St. Servan Sur Mer, Ille de Villaine on 31st July 1824.
At the age of 22, Eugene, now a qualified surveyor,emigrated to New Zealand on the “Phoebe”arriving 29th March 1843. He had been employed by the “New Zealand Company” to survey the Nelson area for land subdivision.
The Maori had not agreed to the sale of land and burnt down the surveyors’ huts.
This resulted in the infamous confrontation at Wairau, which took place on
Saturday 17th June 1843.
Eugene was lucky to survive the massacre as 22 Englishmen were killed.
Years later, as the last survivor of the Wairau Massacre, Eugene wrote an eyewitness account for an Auckland newspaper.
Eugene at some period transferred to Victoria as an Assistant Government Surveyor, for in 1852 he surveyed Essendon, followed by Oakleigh and Mulgrave in 1853.
A handwritten account of his survey of Mulgrave states “lovely land, well grassed, gum, she oak, honeysuckle.” By late 1854, Eugene was working at Ballarat and it was
interesting to discover that he was indirectlyinvolved with the Eureka Rebellion. Whilst out riding with a friend, he went near the Eureka Stockade area and was stopped by a group of men,only being allowed free when they determined he was not a government soldier.
Eugene testified as a witness at the subsequent trials on the Eureka Stockade and his exact words have been recordedfor posterity. (>The Eureka Rebellion data can easily
be located on the Internet.)
I also know he spent time surveying and exploring in South Australia whilst visiting his sister,Marguerite Louise, who had married Arthur William Gliddon.
At some time Eugene transferred to Tasmania, for it wasthere that he married into my family, marrying Maria Margaret Priaulx at the beautiful St George’s Church in
Hobart at the end of January 1855.
Maria Margaret was the daughter of Amelia Hide of Guernsey and Henry Priaulx of Southampton. Henry was the Assistant Commissariat General in Tasmania at that time.
I feel that the families probably knew each other through their seafaring activities, however one branch of my Guernsey Hide’s married a French monsieur and they
christened their two children in the same St. Servan Sur Mer Chapel, so the marriage may have been arranged.
Eugene’s mother and another sister, Mira Elizabeth Georgiana, also emigrated as both died in Tasmania.
In 1862 Eugene returned to work in New Zealand for the British Government where four more children were born. Unfortunately, all of his offspring either died in infancy or did not marry so there are no direct descendants today.
Eugene passed away 23rd September 1898 at Parnell,
Auckland. A photograph is in the 1902 Encyclopaedia
of New Zealand Vol.2.
Leonie Freeman
Thanks to Leonie Freeman we know all this.
also we find in THE CYCLOPEDIA OF NEW ZEALAND
MR. EUGENE BELLAIRS who is at present (1900) attached to the gold mining branch of the Survey Department at Auckland, occupies a unique position, inasmuch as he is probably the sole survivor of the historic Wairau Massacre. The son of the late Captain J. H. Bellairs, of the Royal Navy, the subject of this notice was born in Brittany, France, in 1824. Educated in his native place and at Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, Mr. Bellairs came to New Zealand early in 1843. Landing at Nelson, he joined one of the survey parties despatched to survey the Wairau Plains on behalf of the New Zealand Company. Shortly after beginning operations, all the survey parties were turned off the land and their huts burnt to the ground, by order of the Maori Chief, Rauparaha. Mr. Bellairs subsequently joined the ill-fated expedition, sent by the Government to apprehend the chiefs who were responsible for this act. The result is well-known, for about twenty Europeans, including most of the leading men of Nelson, were creuelly and treacherously massacred, after their surrender to Rauparaha under promise of safety. Mr. Bellairs was one of the few who effected their escape. Following is a quotation from a local newspaper:-“Shortly afterwards he joined his cousin, Captain Bull, who, with a detachment of his regiment (H.M. 99th), was stationed on the Blue Mountains (New South Wales), in charge of a stockade where some 300 convicts were engaged in road-making. In 1846 Mr. Bellairs accompanied, as a cadet, the first overland expedition that ever attempted to reach South Australia by the Darling River. This party was organised by a Mr. Ray, with a view of taking to Adelaide a mob of cattle and horses. The trip took ten months to accomplish. At the time, they were considered to have been very fortunate in getting through, as the blacks were known to be the very worst they could have encountered, and more especially as the expedition numbered only sixteen all told. Shortly after his arrival in Adelaide, Mr. Bellairs received an appointment on the survey staff, under Captain Frome, R.E., and at the end of the ‘forties’ surveyed a road through the 120 mile scrub desert between the Murray River, near Lake Alexandra, and the Tatitara country. This subsequently, in 1850, became PAGE 180 the highway to the Victorian Goldfields, effecting a saving of some seventy-five miles, as compared with the old Mount Gambier Road. Mr. Bellairs, after the action at the Eureka Stockade, took cypher despatches for the officer in charge of the Ballarat military encampment—a Major Thomas—to General Macarthur, whom he found encamped at Ballan, on his way with reinforcements to support that officer. About 1862 Mr. Bellairs returned to New Zealand, and was engaged by the Government in making surveys under the late Major Heaphy, during active operations in the Waikato.” Mr. Bellairs was married in Tasmania in 1855 to the second daughter of Mr. H. Priaulx, Assistant Commissary General of that colony
In the newspaper we find
The death at Auckland of Mr. Eugene Bellairs, formerly of the Government Survey Department, was briefly noted in The Post a short time- ago. Before his retirement, some years back, Mr. Bellairs was for a. long time stationed in Wellington, and was a well-known resident of the Thorndon end of the city. According to a notice in the New Zealand Herald, he had the unique distinction of being the sole survivor of the historic Wairau massacre. The son of the late Captain J. H. Bellairs, of the Royal Navy, he was bom in Brittany, France, in 1824. Educated in hie native place and at Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, Mr. Bellairs came to New Zealand early in 1843. Landing at Nelson, he joined one of the survey parties despatched to survey the Wairau Plains on behalf of the New Zealand Company. Shortly after beginning operations, all the survey parties were turned off the land and their huts burnt to the ground, by order of the Maori chief ftauparaha. Mr. Bellairs subsequently joined the illfated expedition sent by the Government to apprehend the chiefs who were responsible for this act. The result m well known, for about twenty Europeans, including most of the leading men of Nelson, -were cruelly and treacherously massacred, after their surrender to Itauparaha, under promise of safety. Mr. Bellairs was ope of the few who effected their escape. He afterwards went to Australia, where he was engaged in survey work. After the action of the Eureka Stockade, he took cypher despatches for the officer in charge of the Ballarat military encampment. About 1862 Mv Bellairs returned to New Zealand, and was engaged by the Government in making surveys, under the late Major Heaphy, during active operations in the Waikato. Fifty years ago today the Bank of New Zealand was established in Auckland—l6th October, 1861.
also from the newspaper
THE WAIRAU MASSACRE.
4_ . To 'the -Editor. Sir, — In a recent issue of the Express, an account was given of the death of an old man named Croudis, or" Crudis, as being one of the last Survivors of the Wairau Massacre. With your permission I send you for publication* a list of the white men present at the affray,, which took place on Saturday, 17th June, 1843, and the following is taken from the "Fourteenth Beporfc of the Directors of the New Zealand Company.— l am, &0., H. L. N. Clabkb. - Havelock, July 24, 1888. 11 Police Magistrate and County Judge, Mr Thompson, massacred; Magistrates, Captain Wakefield and Captain England, massacred; Principal Surveyor, Mr Tuckett, escaped; Crown Prosecutor, Mr Richardson, massacred; Land Agent, Mr Patchet, killed; Company's Storekeeper, Mr Howard, massacred; Surveyors, Mr Cotterill, massacred, J. M. Barnicoat and Mr Bellairs, escaped, [Mr Barnicoat is still living] ; passenger of brig, Mr Ferguson, escaped ; Interpreter, John Brooks, massacred; Chief Malm, died of wounds (body not found) ; Constables : Gapper, wounded, lost use of his hand, Coster and William Gardiner, killed and massacred; Special Constables: Edward Stokes, died of wound's, James McGregor, killed, Eichard Burnet, wounded, John- Gay,, William Maunsell, and John Nolan, escaped, Jqhnßumforth, lost his arm, Eli Cropper, Wm. Northam, Henry Bumforth, Thomes Tyrrell 1 , and Isaac Smith, killed or maseaoredv Eichard Warner, escaped; Boatmen: Thomas Pay, killed or massacred, Samuel Goddard, Abraham Yollard, John Kidson, George Bampton, apd Wm. Burt, escaped ; men engaged on the survey :_H. Richardson, Thomas Hannam, W. Chamberlain, James Grant, Eichard Peanter, Wm. Morrison, Joseph Morgan, and John Miller, escaped, Eobert Crawford and John Smith, wounded, ■ Wm. Clansey, John Burton, and Thomas Eadcliffe, killed or massacred, Henry Wray, escaped.— The foregoing acount of the massacre at the Wairau has been- carefully taken from that drawn up by one of the Wellington Magistrates who was present at the examination of witnesses on board the Government brig, and afterwards at Wellington, and published m the Supplement of the New Zealand Gazette, from one given m the' Nelson Examiner immediately afterwards, from a written statement with which we have been favoured- by Mr Barnicoat, and from the depositions of survivors, taken . by the Nelson Magistrates."

Mr E. E. Bellairs, Government Surveyor, who has received notice that his servioes will be dispensed with at the end of the month, baa been in the Government employ thirtythroe years. He oamo to iho Colony in 1813, and was one of those who escaped in the Wairau massacre.

He was the brother in law of Emily Hannah Priaulx and her husband William Heath Vlieland.




MR. EUGENE BELLAIRS, who is at present (1900) attached to the gold mining branch of the Survey Department at Auckland, occupies a unique position, inasmuch as he is probably the sole survivor of the historic Wairau Massacre. The son of the late Captain J. H. Bellairs, of the Royal Navy, the subject of this notice was born in Brittany, France, in 1824. Educated in his native place and at Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, Mr. Bellairs came to New Zealand early in 1843. Landing at Nelson, he joined


Mr. E. Bellairs.

one of the survey parties despatched to survey the Wairau Plains on behalf of the New Zealand Company. Shortly after beginning operations, all the survey parties were turned off the land and their huts burnt to the ground, by order of the Maori Chief, Rauparaha. Mr. Bellairs subsequently joined the ill-fated expedition, sent by the Government to apprehend the chiefs who were responsible for this act. The result is well-known, for about twenty Europeans, including most of the leading men of Nelson, were creuelly and treacherously massacred, after their surrender to Rauparaha under promise of safety. Mr. Bellairs was one of the few who effected their escape. Following is a quotation from a local newspaper:-“Shortly afterwards he joined his cousin, Captain Bull, who, with a detachment of his regiment (H.M. 99th), was stationed on the Blue Mountains (New South Wales), in charge of a stockade where some 300 convicts were engaged in road-making. In 1846 Mr. Bellairs accompanied, as a cadet, the first overland expedition that ever attempted to reach South Australia by the Darling River. This party was organised by a Mr. Ray, with a view of taking to Adelaide a mob of cattle and horses. The trip took ten months to accomplish. At the time, they were considered to have been very fortunate in getting through, as the blacks were known to be the very worst they could have encountered, and more especially as the expedition numbered only sixteen all told. Shortly after his arrival in Adelaide, Mr. Bellairs received an appointment on the survey staff, under Captain Frome, R.E., and at the end of the ‘forties’ surveyed a road through the 120 mile scrub desert between the Murray River, near Lake Alexandra, and the Tatitara country. This subsequently, in 1850, became the highway to the Victorian Goldfields, effecting a saving of some seventy-five miles, as compared with the old Mount Gambier Road. Mr. Bellairs, after the action at the Eureka Stockade, took cypher despatches for the officer in charge of the Ballarat military encampment—a Major Thomas—to General Macarthur, whom he found encamped at Ballan, on his way with reinforcements to support that officer. About 1862 Mr. Bellairs returned to New Zealand, and was engaged by the Government in making surveys under the late Major Heaphy, during active operations in the Waikato.” Mr. Bellairs was married in Tasmania in 1855 to the second daughter of Mr. H. Priaulx, Assistant Commissary General of that colony.

Wednesday, 10 August 2011

The Priaulx family.


Busy with Guernsey and the Priaulx family still not all information was in this blog.
So lets start from the beginning.
Nicholas Priaulx had a son Henry Priaulx in Southampton.
Henry Priaulx married Amelia Hide in 1828.

They went together to Tasminia where their children were born.
Henry William Priaulx born 1 DEC 1830 Tasmania, Australia and died in 1858
Emily Hannah Priaulx born 12 SEP 1832 Tasmania, Australia who married William Heath Vlieland
Maria Margaret Priaulx born 31 JUL 1833 Tasmania, Australia who married Eugene Bellairs.
Clarinda Elizabeth Priaulx born 03 JUN 1835 Tasmania, Australia
Louisa Priaulx born 26 OCT 1836 Tasmania, Australia
Priaulx
Marianne Helen Priaulx 19 jan 1839
Elizabeth Chapelier Priaulx 22 Nov 1843
Official sources give different dates for the births !
Henry became the Assistant Commissariat General based in Hobart.
He returned to Guernsey after the death of Amelia Hide in February 8th, 1855 with 5 unmarried daughters.
Amelia died in 1853 in Hobart as did his son Henry William George at Sandy Bay in 1858.
He also worked in the Commissariat Department.
One daughter remained in Tasmania, Maria Margaret Priaulx who married at the beautiful St George’s Church in Hobart at the end of January 1855 Eugene Bellairs, surveyor and explorer, and she died in New Zealand

I feel that the families Bellairs and Priaulx family´s probably knew each other through their seafaring activities.
Two children were born to Eugene and Maria at Launceston, Adele Marie Louise in 1859 and Henry Eugene in 1861.
Eugene’s mother and another sister, Mira Elizabeth Georgiana, also emigrated as both died in Tasmania.
In 1862 Eugene returned to work in New Zealand for the British Government where four more children were born. Unfortunately, all of his offspring either died in
infancy or did not marry so there are no direct descendants today.
Eugene passed away 23rd September 1898 at Parnell,
Auckland. A photograph is in the 1902 Encyclopaedia of New Zealand Vol.2.
Another daughter of Henry and Amalia is Emily Hannah Priaulx
Who married William Heath Vlieland
He was the executor of the will of Henry Priaulx who then lived at Linden cottage, West hill
The jointly started a school ,but went bancrupt.
Emily Hannah Priaulx died in Ulverston still being a teacher .

Henry Priaulx had a difficult time in Tasmania .
During his commissariat of Tasmania a lot went on .
click to read the story.
Mutiny at Deloraine: Ganging and Convict Resistance
in 1840s Van Diemen’s Land.by Tom Dunning and Hamish Maxwell-Stewart


Surname: PRIANLY

Given Names: ELIZABETH CHAPELIER

Event: Birth

Father/Spouse Surname: HENRY

Mother/Spouse Given Names: HYDE AMELIA

Day: 22

Month: 11

Year: 1843

Age:

Sex: F

Spouse Age:

Spouse Sex:

Registration Place: LAUNCESTON

Registration Number: 1764/1843

Reference: RGD 33


Surname: PRIAULX

Given Names: CLARINDA ELIZABETH

Event: Baptism

Father/Spouse Surname: HENRY

Mother/Spouse Given Names: AMELIA

Day: 28

Month: 12

Year: 1834

Age:

Sex: F

Spouse Age:

Spouse Sex:

Registration Place: LAUNCESTON

Registration Number: 6447/1835

Reference: RGD 32


Surname: PRIAULX

Given Names: EMILY HANNAH

Event: Baptism

Father/Spouse Surname: HENRY

Mother/Spouse Given Names: AMELIA

Day: 31

Month: 12

Year: 1831

Age:

Sex: F

Spouse Age:

Spouse Sex:

Registration Place: LAUNCESTON

Registration Number: 4540/1832

Reference: RGD 32


Surname: PRIAULX

Given Names: Name Not Recorded

Event: Birth

Father/Spouse Surname: HENRY

Mother/Spouse Given Names: HYDE SARAH

Day: 00

Month: 1

Year: 1839

Age:

Sex: F

Spouse Age:

Spouse Sex:

Registration Place: LAUNCESTON

Registration Number: 44/1839

Reference: RGD 33


Surname: PRIAULX

Given Names: HENRY WILLIAM GEORGE

Event: Baptism

Father/Spouse Surname: HENRY

Mother/Spouse Given Names: AMELIA

Day: 03

Month: 9

Year: 1830

Age:

Sex: M

Spouse Age:

Spouse Sex:

Registration Place: LAUNCESTON

Registration Number: 3634/1830

Reference: RGD 32


Surname: PRIAULX

Given Names: LILLIAN

Event: Birth

Father/Spouse Surname: ROBERT EDWARD

Mother/Spouse Given Names: FREEMAN MARGARET JEAN

Day: 30

Month: 3

Year: 1896

Age:

Sex: F

Spouse Age:

Spouse Sex:

Registration Place: HOBART

Registration Number: 257/1896

Reference: RGD 33


Surname: PRIAULX

Given Names: LOUISA

Event: Baptism

Father/Spouse Surname: HENRY

Mother/Spouse Given Names: AMELIA

Day: 15

Month: 9

Year: 1836

Age:

Sex: F

Spouse Age:

Spouse Sex:

Registration Place: LAUNCESTON

Registration Number: 7194/1836

Reference: RGD 32


Surname: PRIAULX

Given Names: MARIA MARGARET

Event: Baptism

Father/Spouse Surname: HENRY

Mother/Spouse Given Names: AMELIA

Day: 06

Month: 6

Year: 1833

Age:

Sex: F

Spouse Age:

Spouse Sex:

Registration Place: LAUNCESTON

Registration Number: 5045/1833

Reference: RGD 32


Surname: PRIAULX

Given Names: MARIANNE HELEN HANNA

Event: Baptism

Father/Spouse Surname: HENRY

Mother/Spouse Given Names: AMELIA

Day: 19

Month: 1

Year: 1839

Age:

Sex: F

Spouse Age:

Spouse Sex:

Registration Place: LAUNCESTON

Registration Number: 308/1839

Reference: RGD 32


Surname: PRIAULT

Given Names: AMELIA

Event: Death

Father/Spouse Surname:

Mother/Spouse Given Names:

Day: 11

Month: 11

Year: 1853

Age: 45

Sex: F

Spouse Age:

Spouse Sex:

Registration Place: HOBART

Registration Number: 609/1853

Reference: RGD 35


Surname: PRIAULX

Given Names: HENRY W G

Event: Death

Father/Spouse Surname:

Mother/Spouse Given Names:

Day: 06

Month: 9

Year: 1858

Age: 29

Sex: M

Spouse Age:

Spouse Sex:

Registration Place: HOBART

Registration Number: 1096/1858

Reference: RGD 35


Surname: PRIAULX

Given Names: MARIA MARGARET

Event: Marriage

Father/Spouse Surname: BELLAIRS

Mother/Spouse Given Names: EUGENE

Day: 31

Month: 1

Year: 1855

Age: Adult

Sex: F

Spouse Age: Adult

Spouse Sex: M

Registration Place: HOBART

Registration Number: 223/1855

Reference: RGD 37


Surname: PRIAULX

Given Names: MARTHA

Event: Marriage

Father/Spouse Surname: GRIFFIN

Mother/Spouse Given Names: JOHN

Day: 04

Month: 11

Year: 1858

Age: Adult

Sex: F

Spouse Age: Adult

Spouse Sex: M

Registration Place: HOBART

Registration Number: 466/1858

Reference: RGD 37


Surname: PRIAULX

Given Names: ROBERT EDWARD

Event: Marriage

Father/Spouse Surname: FREEMAN

Mother/Spouse Given Names: MARGARET JEAN

Day: 05

Month: 6

Year: 1888

Age: 31

Sex: M

Spouse Age: 22

Spouse Sex: F

Registration Place: HOBART

Registration Number: 203/1888

Reference: RGD 37


A

Sunday, 7 August 2011

Guernsey

Also combining a holiday break and genealogy.
We were in St.Peters Port Guernsey.
We wanted to find out more about the Lefevre seal .
We found a Lefevre street

And wanted to look for that seal and also discover more about Emily Hannah Priaulx.

But the archives were closed.



In the English Vlieland family the seal is kept and treasured for it was thought to be the crest of Jerome Nicholas Vlieland .

But the Dutch center for heraldry found out is was the crest of the Lefevre family of Guernsey.
So how did this seal ended up in the Vlieland family who could it belong to?
Well the connection with the Lefebures as the original name of the Lefevres is from Elisabeth Lefebures.
She had a will dated 1824 and proved 1827.
She married on 8 December 1808 at St Alphage Church Greenwich when she was 48 years old with John Samworth of Greenwich Kent.
She is described as late Elizabeth Lefebure widow
This John Samworth had a son by his first wife born in 1790.
This son had a daughter Frances Elizabeth Samworth in 1825 and she married Jerome Nicholas Vlieland the younger or the vicar as we say.
The seal must have past down the family to her and with the passage of time through the Vlieland family.
So that was the story of the seal .
Another connection with Guernsey is Emily Hannah Priaulx ,the wife of William Heath Vlieland.
She is the daughter Henry Priaulx and Amelia Hide
We received from the Priaulx library the marriage certificate of Henry and Amelia.

So still there is lot to look for .
Reason enough to go back to Guernsey some day for some time as we really enjoyed it there.

the Tolhouse

In the perlustration of Yarmouth we find another clue to Dutch fishermen in Yarmouth.
At the east end of Row No. 106, fronting Middlegate Street, and occupying the space between this Row and Row No. 108, is a very ancient building, which for centuries has been designated the TOLHOUSE , because from a very early period the bailiffs were accustomed to receive their tolls or dues in the great chamber on the first floor. Some portions of the original structure still remain. An external staircase leads to a large early English stone doorway, which has the tooth ornament on the jambs, with good mouldings and shafts. On the landing, fronting this doorway and looking into the street is an unglazed two-light early English window with cinquefoil heads and shafts in the jambs. A large oaken door opens into what was the great hall, extending the whole length of the building. It is now greatly obstructed by the erection of a gallery, extending across it for the accommodation of the grand jury; and a low flat ceiling now takes the place of the former open-timbered roof. On the west side of the hall, a small but elegantly proportioned stone doorway (of the same period as the great doorway), leading from the hall to some inner apartment now demolished, was accidentally discovered in 1847, it having been previously plastered over. It has the tooth ornament in the arch mouldings, but not in the jambs. This building was also called the Host House, because in the great chamber the hosts to whom foreign fishermen intrusted the sale of their herrings, were accustomed, to assemble and pay their "heighning money," being the difference between the "tide price" fixed by the corporation when the fish were first landed and the actual selling price; which difference the corporation claimed as part of the town revenue. Hence the above apartment was also called the Heighning Chamber.
* So late as 1808 there was but one court-yard for all descriptions of prisoners; and in 1818 the grand jury reported that there was then no classification of prisoners. A considerable enlargement soon afterwards took place. f A larceny to the value of 12d. was punished with death; and the only way of saving the criminal from capital punishment was by the jury declaring the value of the goods stolen to be under that amount, or by the offender claiming what was called "Benefit of Clergy." So great was the respect for learning in the middle ages, and so powerful had the clergy become, that if a prisoner declared he was a cleric, the proof being his ability to read, he escaped; the clergy claiming exemption .

Thursday, 4 August 2011

Heaths and Hemblington

Combining holidays with genealogy provides us with these pictures.
His grandchild 4x removed send us these.
The Saxon/Norman church where the Heath family lived for a hundred or so years and where Bishop Blomfield Anna Maria Heath married the sister of Sarah Heath (wife of Jerome) was lovely.
It is solitary on high ground in the Parish of Hemblington which (since 1925) consists of that and nearby Blofield Heath (where Sarah's ancestor came from).
It has a beautiful font covered in painted figures and a wall painting (the best in the country depicting St Christopher's life.
The hall is large and now contains large totally separate dwellings.
I attach pictures of the font and church where the Heath family worshipped.